New research: Waste can create food and jobs-and help fight climate change

New research: Waste can create food and jobs-and help fight climate change

A brand new research by the University of Ghana has proven that utilizing oil palm waste on vegetable farms may double yield and at the same time help fight climate change.

The elevated yield will improve farmers’ earnings and create hundreds of jobs in rural areas, thereby assuaging poverty.

“Poverty, malnutrition, and unemployment are very high in rural Ghana. The oil palm waste– the material left after taking out palm fruits from bunches—is right at their doorstep in large quantities, and our research shows the waste could give these people hope for a better future,” says Dr. Eric Oppong Danso, who’s main the research at the University of Ghana’s Forest and Horticultural Crops Research Centre.

Huge quantities of oil palm waste are produced in oil palm plantations in Ghana. Every day, around 300 tonnes of this waste is produced, and often it’s burned off, thereby worsening climate change.  But as a substitute of being burned off, the waste can be used as natural fertilizer on vegetable farms to improve yield and mitigate emissions from uncontrolled burning.

New research: Waste can create food and jobs-and help fight climate change

“The vegetable market in Ghana is growing at over 10% per year, with the potential to employ thousands of rural farmers and help alleviate poverty. However, declining soil fertility will make it increasingly difficult to realize this potential without replenishing soil nutrients” Dr.  Oppong Danso, explained.

The researchers discovered that by throwing simply 30 kg of the oil palm waste on eggplant fields, they might improve the yield from 60 tonnes per hectare to 140 tonnes per hectare. This was proven at an experiment carried out within the Okumaning village of japanese Ghana.

“This means that farmers can have a better income and livelihood, and at the same time, more jobs will be created right from the farm, through the market, to the dining table,” Dr. Oppong Danso emphasised.

New research: Waste can create food and jobs-and help fight climate change

Vegetables have greater dietary advantages in contrast with what’s current in cassava, maize, and other on a regular basis meals consumed in Ghana, however yields are very low due to low soil high quality. By mobilizing Ghana’s largely unused oil palm waste, vegetable yields could possibly be doubled and thereby help fight malnutrition and starvation in Ghana.

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Credit: myjoyonline

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