Low traffic neighbourhoods reduce pollution and traffic in surrounding areas, study finds

Low traffic neighbourhoods reduce pollution and traffic in surrounding areas, study finds

L

ow traffic neighbourhoods (LTNs) reduce traffic and air pollution and don’t displace the issues elsewhere, in accordance to new research.

The study by researchers at Imperial College London examined three LTNs in Islington in contrast pollution and traffic ranges contained in the zones, on surrounding streets and at management websites additional away.

The LTNs – in St Peter’s, Canonbury and Clerkenwell – had been all put in place throughout July and September 2020.

The study constructed a mannequin which managed for the other elements which have an effect on traffic or pollution, such because the Covid guidelines in place, school holidays or climate.

It discovered that concentrations of nitrogen dioxide fell by 5.7 percent inside the LTNs and by simply under 9 percent on their boundaries, in contrast to the management websites.

They additionally discovered that traffic dropped by over half contained in the LTNs and by 13 percent at the boundaries, in contrast to the management websites.

Dr Audrey de Nazelle, from Imperial’s Centre for Environmental Policy, said: “This research effectively disproves the argument that low-traffic zones will necessarily cause an increase in traffic and air pollution in neighbouring streets.

An anti-LTN protest in Ealing

/ Handout

“In the three areas we looked at, they reduced both traffic volumes and, significantly, air pollution both inside and on the edges of the zone.

“Alongside the other benefits of LTNs that have been shown in previous research – such as improvements in safety and an increase in walking and cycling – this makes a very strong argument in their favour.”

Co-author PhD pupil Helen Yang said the mannequin was the primary to analyse the effects of LTNs on surrounding areas, saying the outcomes had been “really encouraging”.

However, she added: “We worked with a relatively small data set and further research is now needed to confirm these findings at a larger scale.”

More than 100 LTNs, that are designed to forestall drivers utilizing residential streets as brief cuts, and 500 school streets, which ban non-residents from driving previous schools at the beginning and finish of the school day, are in place throughout the capital.

However, critics have staged protests against them, with some saying they’re too disruptive and usually launched with out thorough consultations from native councils.

Source:standard.co.uk

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