Extinction Rebellion protesters target Knightsbridge, Government buildings following Cop27

Extinction Rebellion protesters target Knightsbridge, Government buildings following Cop27

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xtinction Rebellion and other local weather activists have focused 13 central London companies and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) constructing in a string of demonstrations following following Cop27.

The group said ‘fake oil’ was poured over places of work and entrance steps, a fire was lit and faux blood poured on the pavement exterior companies believed to have hyperlinks to the fossil gas business on Monday morning.

Protests took place at BP, Hill+Knowlton Strategies, BAE Systems, Church House, Ineos, Eversheds Sutherland, Schlumberger, the International Maritime Organisation, the Institute of Economic Affairs, JP Morgan, Arch Insurance, the Ontario Teachers Pension Plan and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

The motion follows the conclusion of Cop27 in Egypt, which was criticised for falling in need of reducing the emissions that trigger local weather change.

Extinction Rebellion spokesperson Sarah Hart said: “Extinction Rebellion are sending the message that it’s time to cut the ties with fossil fuels or lose the social license to operate in the UK.

“While the rest of us worry about the cost of turning the heating on our government is prioritising the profits of the very companies that are jeopardising our climate and environment.”

Ocean Rebellion held a dramatic demonstration exterior the places of work of the International Maritime Organisation, together with activists vomiting faux oil and inflicting a fire.

Performances illustrated the UN delivery body’s refusal to regulate delivery emissions, Extinction Rebellion said. A plume of smog stuffed the air and an oil slick appeared on the bottom with dead birds caught in it.

Others carrying fish heads and pinstripe fits called on the Government to finish overfishing British waters.

Spokesperson Suzanne Stallard said:“Overfishing is one of the most serious threats to our Ocean. It is the leading driver of marine biodiversity loss and critically undermines the resilience of fish and other wildlife to climate change.”

XR Cymru poured faux oil over public relations consultancy Hill+Knowlton Strategies in Clerkenwell Green, whereas Doctors for XR glued themselves to the home windows of JP Morgan’s London headquarters.

Christian Climate Action supporters took motion at BAE Systems and Church House in Westminster to “highlight the Church of England’s failing strategy to stay invested in fossil fuels and influence the industry as shareholders”, Extinction Rebellion said.

XR South West sprayed faux oil on the BEIS constructing to protest against its plans to subject greater than 100 new licences for exploration and extraction of oil and gasoline within the North Sea.

Oil was sprayed over multinational legislation agency Eversheds Sutherland and a number of other places.

Source:standard.co.uk

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