Ballet star Tamara Rojo: moving arts cash from London won’t help

Ballet star Tamara Rojo: moving arts cash from London won’t help

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allet star Tamara Rojo says “punishing London” by moving arts funding out of the capital will not help the remainder of the country.

The dancer who’s leaving English National Ballet after 10 years in cost, said the transfer by Arts Council England was “simplistic”.

The cuts to the capital, which noticed establishments such because the Donmar Warehouse and English National Opera lose all their funding, got here after the Government ordered the Arts Council to funnel £24 million of funding a year from London to the areas with one other £8 million being spent on serving to London-based teams go away the capital.

Other teams, from the Southbank Centre to the Royal Opera House, have lost a few of their funding.

The Government said the plan was to take the arts to “places all too often overlooked” however Rojo said that shouldn’t be “at the expense of London”. She told the BBC: “I’m not sure that punishing London is going to help anybody else.”

English National Ballet will lose about 5 per cent of its revenue due to the cuts.

The Spanish dancer, who grew up in Madrid however got here to the UK to dance aged 22, additionally said she would maybe have by no means come right here under present immigration guidelines.

The 48-year-old said her profession flourished as a result of “Britain opened its arms to a Spanish immigrant that didn’t speak any English”. Rojo, who’s leaving to head up the San Francisco Ballet, said she would “not have passed the English test” and would have been unable to get a visa as she was not a longtime star when she moved right here.

The Arts Council introduced this month it was reducing the money from arts organisations in London in its 2023-26 settlement to fulfil a Government instruction to divert money away from the capital as a part of the levelling-up programme.

It insists London will nonetheless obtain a 3rd of all of the funding introduced and says its ambition is “to ensure a more even spread of funding”.

Culture Secretary Michelle Donelan has defended moving funding from London, saying “it will see organisations in places all too often overlooked get the support they need to transform access to the arts for everyone”.

This week, lots of of individuals demonstrated outdoors the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport in response to the cuts.

Actor Juliet Stevenson, who was among the many protesters, said: “The Government’s line that this is levelling-up makes no sense at all. Spreading slashed funding more thinly doesn’t help our economy or communities anywhere in the UK.

“This is an agenda of cultural vandalism to silence innovative work, attack terms and conditions, and throw arts funding into the hands of a wealthy few.”

Source:standard.co.uk

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